Interested in a PLAGIARISM-FREE paper based on these particular instructions?...with 100% confidentiality?

Order Now

write 250+ words.& references atleast 2 Describe the communication process. How do barriers to communication affect this process? Provide an example of a barrier that you have encountered and how you have overcome the barrier?( answer this) ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. comment on both #1 seperately. write 3 lines each comment. #1 When we talk to another person or a group of people we want them to understand what we are saying and give valuable feedback. You first start off with a sender, encoding, decoding, receiver, and feedback. The sender is the person or group who comes up with an idea. The encoding is where the person conveys their message with the group. The decoding is where the people receiving the message interpret the message. The receiver is the person who the message is intended for and the feedback is their idea and interpretation on message gave them. Barriers of communication are language, culture, and the people who are listening get distracted or bored. In today’s world, we also use text lingo which can be a barrier to people who don’t know all the lingo. The businesses also have their own lingo and if a person who is just starting there doesn’t know the lingo it can be hard. Other barriers can be at that they can’t hear you or see you; they may also have a difficult time talking which can cause a barrier to communication. Another barrier is the person thinks the message is irrelevant to them or they interpret it differently than the sender meant. Ways to overcome barriers is the sender can say this is what I believe you are trying to tell me, is that what you are meaning? If language is a barrier you can have someone there who interpret the language for you. If culture is a barrier you can learn the culture and way things are done there. “Culture can be a significant impact on communication. Some cultures are open and supportive of input from employees and a two-way flow of communication. Other cultures are more top-down; leaders convey messages but don’t seek out input from staff, or often even customers.” (Richards, 2017, p. 1) If speech is difficult for them you could have them write it or you can be patient and listen and ask if you are understanding them correctly. If they can’t hear you speak up but don’t yell at them. “By successfully getting your message across, you convey your thoughts and ideas effectively. When not successful, the thoughts and ideas that you convey do not necessarily reflect your own, causing a communications breakdown and creating roadblocks that stand in the way of your goals – both personally and professionally” (Mind Tools Editorial Team, n.d., p. 1) #2 As described by Cliff 2016, the goal of communication is to convey information—and the understanding of that information—from one person or group to another person or group. This communication process is divided into three basic components: A sender transmits a message through a channel to the receiver. The sender first develops an idea, which is composed into a message and then transmitted to the other party, who interprets the message and receives meaning. Information theorists have added somewhat more complicated language. Developing a message is known as encoding. Interpreting the message is referred to as decoding. Here are some barriers that can damage proper communication: The use of jargon. Over-complicated, unfamiliar and/or technical terms. Emotional barriers and taboos. Some people may find it difficult to express their emotions and some topics may be completely ‘off-limits’ or taboo. Lack of attention, interest, distractions, or irrelevance to the receiver. Differences in perception and viewpoint. Physical disabilities such as hearing problems or speech difficulties. Physical barriers to non-verbal communication. Not being able to see the non-verbal cues, gestures, posture and general body language can make communication less effective. Language differences and the difficulty in understanding unfamiliar accents. Cultural differences. The norms of social interaction vary greatly in different cultures, as do the way in which emotions are expressed. For example, the concept of personal space varies between cultures and between different social settings. (Skills, 2011) In my personal experience, I have had challenges with barriers such the use of jargon or idiomatic expressions and acronyms in a non-native language. When I first started working in the U.S. and had to communicate properly in English, I faced some situations where idiomatic expressions where used such as “to cut some slack” and acronyms such as “ASAP” or “FYI”. Those are pretty common terms in the business world here, but for a non-native speaker it can be confusing to understand them. So, my strategy was to pay attention to context and actually ask people for clarification. And then, try to use the terms that I wasn’t familiar before to remember their meaning.

write 250+ words.& references atleast 2

Describe the communication process. How do barriers to communication affect this process?

Provide an example of a barrier that you have encountered and how you have overcome the barrier?( answer this)

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

comment on both #1 seperately. write 3 lines each comment.

#1

When we talk to another person or a group of people we want them to understand what we are saying and give valuable feedback. You first start off with a sender, encoding, decoding, receiver, and feedback. The sender is the person or group who comes up with an idea. The encoding is where the person conveys their message with the group. The decoding is where the people receiving the message interpret the message. The receiver is the person who the message is intended for and the feedback is their idea and interpretation on message gave them.

Barriers of communication are language, culture, and the people who are listening get distracted or bored. In today’s world, we also use text lingo which can be a barrier to people who don’t know all the lingo. The businesses also have their own lingo and if a person who is just starting there doesn’t know the lingo it can be hard. Other barriers can be at that they can’t hear you or see you; they may also have a difficult time talking which can cause a barrier to communication. Another barrier is the person thinks the message is irrelevant to them or they interpret it differently than the sender meant.

Ways to overcome barriers is the sender can say this is what I believe you are trying to tell me, is that what you are meaning? If language is a barrier you can have someone there who interpret the language for you. If culture is a barrier you can learn the culture and way things are done there. “Culture can be a significant impact on communication. Some cultures are open and supportive of input from employees and a two-way flow of communication. Other cultures are more top-down; leaders convey messages but don’t seek out input from staff, or often even customers.” (Richards, 2017, p. 1) If speech is difficult for them you could have them write it or you can be patient and listen and ask if you are understanding them correctly. If they can’t hear you speak up but don’t yell at them. “By successfully getting your message across, you convey your thoughts and ideas effectively. When not successful, the thoughts and ideas that you convey do not necessarily reflect your own, causing a communications breakdown and creating roadblocks that stand in the way of your goals – both personally and professionally” (Mind Tools Editorial Team, n.d., p. 1)

#2

As described by Cliff 2016, the goal of communication is to convey information—and the understanding of that information—from one person or group to another person or group. This communication process is divided into three basic components: A sender transmits a message through a channel to the receiver. The sender first develops an idea, which is composed into a message and then transmitted to the other party, who interprets the message and receives meaning. Information theorists have added somewhat more complicated language. Developing a message is known as encoding. Interpreting the message is referred to as decoding.

Here are some barriers that can damage proper communication:

The use of jargon. Over-complicated, unfamiliar and/or technical terms.

Emotional barriers and taboos. Some people may find it difficult to express their emotions and some topics may be completely ‘off-limits’ or taboo.

Lack of attention, interest, distractions, or irrelevance to the receiver.

Differences in perception and viewpoint.

Physical disabilities such as hearing problems or speech difficulties.

Physical barriers to non-verbal communication. Not being able to see the non-verbal cues, gestures, posture and general body language can make communication less effective.

Language differences and the difficulty in understanding unfamiliar accents.

Cultural differences. The norms of social interaction vary greatly in different cultures, as do the way in which emotions are expressed. For example, the concept of personal space varies between cultures and between different social settings. (Skills, 2011)

In my personal experience, I have had challenges with barriers such the use of jargon or idiomatic expressions and acronyms in a non-native language. When I first started working in the U.S. and had to communicate properly in English, I faced some situations where idiomatic expressions where used such as “to cut some slack” and acronyms such as “ASAP” or “FYI”.

Those are pretty common terms in the business world here, but for a non-native speaker it can be confusing to understand them. So, my strategy was to pay attention to context and actually ask people for clarification. And then, try to use the terms that I wasn’t familiar before to remember their meaning.

Interested in a PLAGIARISM-FREE paper based on these particular instructions?...with 100% confidentiality?

Order Now