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Discussion Question: Leadership Expert of the Week: Using any public or political figure, explain the dark side of leadership. The dark side of leadership is an open ended concept that can be used to describe any unwanted or less desirable behaviors (agendas) on behalf of a leader. Indicate why you believe some leaders perceive to be “exempt” from written rules and norms of society. It is very important! News anchor specialist (Job B)-Unveils current event article on a hot topic related to leadership and change. Preferably, the topic will be related to the reading material for the week. Additionally, this role may also choose to discuss an ethical/unethical issue as it pertains to the material discussed in the chapter. The selected topic may come from news articles, news stories, and/or publications that are relevant to the chapters assigned each week. You need more than one additional academic source beyond the text You should do this homework like this example! News Anchor Specialist (Job B): Hello, fellow Trojans! This week, we are talking about power and influence as it relates to leadership. Although most people may think power and influence are synonymous, they are actually two different things. According to our text, power is “the capacity to produce effects on others or the potential to influence others”, while influence is the “change in a target agent’s attitudes, beliefs, or behaviors as a result of influence tactics” (Hughes, Ginnett, & Curphy, 2015). In short, power and influence are a measure of how much you are able to change what another person believes, thinks, or how that person behaves. Today, at the third annual Women Ambassador’s Forum at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, a panel of four women spoke to a roomful of women from 15 countries about how to use power and influence to change peoples’ attitudes and behavior. One of the panelists, Jen Welter, became the first female coach in the National Football League in 2015. Achieving this position always held by men required changing minds and attitudes. Although she started off in advertising with an undergraduate degree in marketing and human resources, she was not content. “I remember telling my mom it feels like I’m dying a little bit each day because I couldn’t imagine myself living out the rest of my life like that,” Welter said (Dallas, 2017). She decided to defy a male-dominated sport and in 2014 became a running back in a men’s semi-pro league, while earning her master’s degree in sports psychology and a Ph.D. in psychology. She then became the coach of a semi-pro team and then in 2015, was signed by the Arizona Cardinals as the first ever female coach in the NFL. Welter’s ability to challenge the status quo and change the attitudes of people was based in one part on expert power, defined in our text as “the power of knowledge” and “relative expertise in particular areas” (Hughes, Ginnett, & Curphy, 2015). Not only did she have the knowledge of a Ph.D. in sports psychology, but she also had practical experience as a player on the field. “Though there was no career for women in football, what I could do was take that practical on-the-field experience and marry it with theoretical knowledge and become someone who was completely unique within the industry” (Dallas, 2017). Once she had attained her position as coach, Welter also gained legitimate power, which is by virtue of her organizational position, and could work on referent power, which is power through interrelationships with the players. Panelist Carla Eboli, chief marketing officer at Dieste, Inc, also encouraged the audience that expert knowledge, advising them to “be knowledgeable about what you’re bringing to the table, and the differences that you are bringing will make the conversation bigger and better.” (Dallas, 2017). Another of the panelists, Maria Cramer, a vice president with Hitachi Consulting, advised the women in the room to be “conscious and aware that those opportunities exist, and then you have to have the courage and strength to step through that door.” (Dallas, 2017). A big lesson to learn from these women is to arm yourself with knowledge and experience in order to gain those positions of authority, and to be brave enough to take opportunities when they come. As our text advises, effective leaders “take advantage of all their sources of power” (Hughes, Ginnett, & Curphy, 2015).

Discussion Question:

Leadership Expert of the Week: Using any public or political figure, explain the dark side of leadership. The dark side of leadership is an open ended concept that can be used to describe any unwanted or less desirable behaviors (agendas) on behalf of a leader. Indicate why you believe some leaders perceive to be “exempt” from written rules and norms of society.

It is very important!

News anchor specialist (Job B)-Unveils current event article on a hot topic related to leadership and change. Preferably, the topic will be related to the reading material for the week. Additionally, this role may also choose to discuss an ethical/unethical issue as it pertains to the material discussed in the chapter. The selected topic may come from news articles, news stories, and/or publications that are relevant to the chapters assigned each week. You need more than one additional academic source beyond the text

You should do this homework like this example!

News Anchor Specialist (Job B):

Hello, fellow Trojans! This week, we are talking about power and influence as it relates to leadership. Although most people may think power and influence are synonymous, they are actually two different things. According to our text, power is “the capacity to produce effects on others or the potential to influence others”, while influence is the “change in a target agent’s attitudes, beliefs, or behaviors as a result of influence tactics” (Hughes, Ginnett, & Curphy, 2015). In short, power and influence are a measure of how much you are able to change what another person believes, thinks, or how that person behaves. Today, at the third annual Women Ambassador’s Forum at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, a panel of four women spoke to a roomful of women from 15 countries about how to use power and influence to change peoples’ attitudes and behavior.

One of the panelists, Jen Welter, became the first female coach in the National Football League in 2015. Achieving this position always held by men required changing minds and attitudes. Although she started off in advertising with an undergraduate degree in marketing and human resources, she was not content. “I remember telling my mom it feels like I’m dying a little bit each day because I couldn’t imagine myself living out the rest of my life like that,” Welter said (Dallas, 2017). She decided to defy a male-dominated sport and in 2014 became a running back in a men’s semi-pro league, while earning her master’s degree in sports psychology and a Ph.D. in psychology. She then became the coach of a semi-pro team and then in 2015, was signed by the Arizona Cardinals as the first ever female coach in the NFL.

Welter’s ability to challenge the status quo and change the attitudes of people was based in one part on expert power, defined in our text as “the power of knowledge” and “relative expertise in particular areas” (Hughes, Ginnett, & Curphy, 2015). Not only did she have the knowledge of a Ph.D. in sports psychology, but she also had practical experience as a player on the field. “Though there was no career for women in football, what I could do was take that practical on-the-field experience and marry it with theoretical knowledge and become someone who was completely unique within the industry” (Dallas, 2017). Once she had attained her position as coach, Welter also gained legitimate power, which is by virtue of her organizational position, and could work on referent power, which is power through interrelationships with the players.

Panelist Carla Eboli, chief marketing officer at Dieste, Inc, also encouraged the audience that expert knowledge, advising them to “be knowledgeable about what you’re bringing to the table, and the differences that you are bringing will make the conversation bigger and better.” (Dallas, 2017). Another of the panelists, Maria Cramer, a vice president with Hitachi Consulting, advised the women in the room to be “conscious and aware that those opportunities exist, and then you have to have the courage and strength to step through that door.” (Dallas, 2017).

A big lesson to learn from these women is to arm yourself with knowledge and experience in order to gain those positions of authority, and to be brave enough to take opportunities when they come. As our text advises, effective leaders “take advantage of all their sources of power” (Hughes, Ginnett, & Curphy, 2015).

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